Welcome to <domainname.com>

Welcome to the default home page of <domainname.com>. Use this page as a placeholder for the Web site of <domain.com>.

Access to your Site Administrator user interface: http://<domain.com>/admin/
 
When you click the above URL, you will be taken to your site administrator user interface. You will need the Site Administrator username, the domain, and password, which was supplied to you by your hosting company.
Access to User Administrator user interface: http://<domain.com>/user/
 
When you click the above URL, you will be taken to the user administrator control page. Each individual user within your site will have access to their own administrator page. To log in, they will need to supply their username, the domain, and the password that was given to them.
Note: You may wish to bookmark these links before replacing the contents of this page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In addition, here are some tips to help you get started in using your Web site. A Web site allows you to publish information in a format called HTML (Hyper Text Markup Language), so that anyone can view your Web site using a browser such as Microsoft Internet Explorer or AOL/Netscape Navigator. You can also use your Web site to send and receive email faster and more efficiently than Web-based email like Hotmail or Yahoo mail. Here is a simple and quick guide to getting your Web site up and running in no time!

Creating a simple Web site
Publishing your Web site
Publicizing your Web site
Configuring your email application tool
Setting up additional user accounts to send and received email

Creating a simple Web site

The easiest way to create your site is to use a Web site-authoring tool, also called an HTML-authoring tool. Some of the more common Web site-authoring tools are Netscape's Composer (which is free and contained in Netscape Communicator and Netscape Navigator browsers), Microsoft FrontPage, and Macromedia Dreamweaver. These tools allow you to create Web pages as easily as documents created using a standard text editor. 

You can also create Web pages on your own, using a text editor and basic HTML code. Pointers to learning HTML include Writing HTML: A tutorial for creating Web pages, Web Monkey, CNET Web Builder, HTML Goodies, Yale Web Style Guide, and W3C HTML Homepage.

Publishing your Web site

When someone enters your site's name in a browser, the Web server returns a file called index.html from your site. To publish your site, first use your Web site-authoring tool to create a file called index.html. You now have to tell your tool to put this file on your site. All Web site-authoring tools have a settings page where you can enter the information to publish the site. Probably the easiest way to do this is using file transfer protocol or FTP. Your FTP login and password are supplied to you by your Web hosting company or your Internet service provider. Just enter your login and password into your tool's publish tab. You will also need to tell your tool to put your modified Web page (index.html) at this location: /var/www/html/index.html. Once you do this, and click the "publish" button, the tool will load the index.html file to your site, and the file will be visible to the world!

If you do not use a Web site-authoring tool, you will need to publish Web pages using the FTP (File Transfer Protocol) application tool.  Some of the more popular ones include WS_FTP, CuteFTP, and BulletProof_FTP for Microsoft Windows based computers and Fetch and Interarchy for Apple Macintosh based computers. Set up the FTP application with the login and password for your site and ask it to connect to your site. Then, use the "put" command to put your local index.html file in the /var/www/html directory to publish the site. For more information on FTP, including simple instructions on how it is done, click here.

Go ahead! Create a simple Web page and publish it on your Web site. For information on how to upload your files using the site administrator user interface file manager, see the online help topic, ''Upload Web site files". Once published, you can browse to your Web site in a browser and see it. You can fill your Web site with text, pictures, sounds, and other features you want your visitors to experience. Here is a link to assorted free clip art that you can use to brighten your site (Netscape's Resources for Creating Web Sites).

Publicizing your Web site

Once you have your Web site up and ready, you can use search engines, newsgroups, or Web rings to publicize your Web site.

Search engines: Probably the most common way to publicize your Web site and generate traffic to it is to submit it to search engines (such as http://www.google.com) and Internet catalogs (such as Yahoo!). To save yourself some time, you might try a service that submits your Web site to multiple search engines and Internet catalogs, such as Submit It!, Add Me!, and Site Solutions.

Newsgroups: Look for newsgroups where you think people, who would be interested in your Web site, might frequent. Post a message announcing your Web site and its features. Do not do this too often as it is sometimes considered spamming (unsolicited advertising).

Web rings:If there are other pages that are similar to yours, there might be a Web ring dedicated to your kind of Web site. A Web ring is a way of interlinking related Web sites so that you can visit each site one after the other, eventually (if you keep going) returning to the first Web site. Typically, users can also elect to go backwards through the ring of sites, skip a certain number at a time, visit sites randomly, or see a list of all the sites on the ring. Do an Internet search, for instance through http://www.google.com, for "Web ring" and include a keyword related to your Web site. If you join a Web ring, you will need to add a Web ring graphic and links to your page.

Configuring your email application tool

Besides providing something that you can browse, a Web site may come with built-in email. Unlike email provided from from AOL, MSN, or Yahoo, your Web site’s email is much faster, has less spam (spam is unsolicited email on the Internet), and you can store all your email on your desktop or laptop computer, so there is practically no limit on how much email you can store.

To receive email, your desktop or laptop computer has to talk to your Web site's mail server program, which is a computer that sends, receives, and stores email messages for users. The mail server program talks a special language called POP (for Post Office Protocol). So, the mail server is also called a POP server. You connect to a POP server with an email application tool, sometimes called a email client or email reader, at which time it delivers your email to you. An email client is a program that you use to contact the mail server. The program allows you to read and delete email, copy and print email messages, and compose and send new email. To get your email from the POP server, you need to configure your mail client, such as Microsoft Outlook or Outlook Express with the login and password supplied when you received your Web site. For instructions on how to create a new email profile for Outlook (2002), click here. When you set up your email client, remember to select the SMTP Auth tag in the setup screen. To get Microsoft Outlook, you either need to buy Microsoft Office or purchase Microsoft Outlook separately—check here for details. For more information on Internet Explorer, click here.

Setting up additional user accounts to send and received email

You may want people, other than yourself, to get email using your site. You can easily do this using your site's control panel, a Web page that allows you to manage your site. To use your site's control panel, follow the link provided when you received your Web site and log in using your control panel login and password. Click on "Mailboxes/Users" in the left navigation bar and then click "Add User" to add users. Each user you add will be allowed to send and receive email. For example, if your domain's name is mydomain.com, then the user's email will be user@mydomain.com. You can choose each user's quota (how much disk space they can use) from the control panel. When you set up a user, remember to tell them how to connect to their mail server (POP server). For more informaton, see configuring your email application tool).

You are all set with email now. Compose some email and then send it to yourself. One way to do this is to use Microsoft Outlook: open Outlook, click the New button, type in your email address, which is your user name followed by the at sign ("@") and the name of your domain (username@mydomain.com), and then click Send. You should receive it in your inbox in a few minutes.